Vegan Mushroom Sauerkraut Pierogi

Boiled, pan-fried, smothered in vegan sour cream, green onion, nutritional yeast.  My husband makes a batch of pierogi once-a-month, and has promised to pass this tradition down to our kiddos.  With almost 3-4 hours of prep time, it's a time commitment, but also a great zen out activity. 

Most people associate pierogi with Polish cuisine, but "pirohy" are also a Slovakian national dish. Traditional fillings run the gambit from sweet to savory.  While some incorporate farmer cheese, sour cream, and various meats, it's fairly easy to make a mostly traditional totally vegan variety. 

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Vegan Mushroom Sauerkraut Pierogi

Pierogi Dough:

3 cups all-purpose flour

¼ cup canola oil

¼ cup water 

dash of salt

1. Mix all the ingredients listed above.  If the dough is too wet, add a little bit more flour.  If the dough is too dry, add a bit more water.  Work the dough until it is smooth.  Then, turn it out on a flat floured surface and knead until it is elastic.  Cover and let it rest for 30 minutes.

Pierogi Filling:

2 Tbsp oil

½ medium onion, finely chopped

2 cups mushrooms, finely chopped 

1 ½ cup drained sauerkraut

2 small baked potatoes

2 Tbsp vegan butter

1. Add oil, onion, mushrooms, and sauerkraut to a large skillet.  Cook over medium heat for 15-20 minutes or until most of the liquid evaporates.  

2. In a separate bowl, smash the potatoes and vegan butter together with a fork.  I leave the skin on because I like getting the extra fiber and minerals, but it's totally up to you.  When most of the potato is about the size of pebbles or the consistency of mashed potatoes, add it to the skillet with the cooked-down sauerkraut mixture.  Cook for a few more minutes, and then, taste.     Add black pepper or salt, if needed, and then, remove from heat to cool down.

Pierogi Assembly:

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1. Roll out the dough until it's about ⅛ inch thick.  Use a water glass like a cookie cutter and cut out circles.  Keep rolling out the dough and cutting out circles until there is no dough left.  Stock pile the circles on a clean plate until you're ready to fill.  The number of pierogi really depends on the size of your glass.  We average about 30-35 each time.

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2. To fold the pierogi, re-roll the circle, and place in the palm of your hand.

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3. Place filling in the center.  Leave ample space on all sides.

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4. Fold the dough in half.

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5. Crimp the edge between your thumb and your pointer fighter working your way down the open side of the pierogi until it's sealed.  

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6. Place the sealed pierogi on a plate, and fill all of the circles.  Meanwhile, place a very large, deep pot full of water on the stove and bring it to a rapid boil.

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7.  Once the pot comes to a rapid boil, place 1 layer of pierogi in a strainer, and lower into pot.  Boil for 2-3 minutes or until the pierogi float to the top.  Immediately remove strainer with pierogi from the pot.  You can either serve right out of the boiling water, or you can pop them into a skillet and pan-fry them with vegan butter.  

  Served with vegan sour cream, nutritional yeast, and dill lemon sauerkraut. 

Served with vegan sour cream, nutritional yeast, and dill lemon sauerkraut.